Learning History Can Help Students Envision a Preferable Future: Teaching “Changes in the International Order and Mass Society” in the Future

アクセス数 : 59
ダウンロード数 : 20

今月のアクセス数 : 3
今月のダウンロード数 : 1
File
JSSEA_12_23.pdf 612 KB 種類 : fulltext
Title ( eng )
Learning History Can Help Students Envision a Preferable Future: Teaching “Changes in the International Order and Mass Society” in the Future
Creator
IWAHASHI Yoshihiro
Source Title
The Journal of Social Studies Education in Asia
Volume 12
Start Page 23
End Page 39
Number of Pages 17
Journal Identifire
[ISSN] 24341797
[NCID] AA12857878
Abstract
This study addressed how history learning contributes to developing futures foresight and the ability to envision a preferable future by implementing a history lesson based on Hicks’s Citizenship for the future: A practical classroom guide. This included teaching future skills in a “Modern and Contemporary History” course at a Japanese high school. The study analysed two types of data to examine the relationship between history learning and futures foresight: (1) a comparison of student responses to pre- and post-lesson questionnaires, and (2) worksheets used in the lesson. An analysis of these materials clarified that history learning contributes to envisioning a preferable future, by raising students’ interest in the futures and their keenness towards contemporary issues, and helping them realize the temporal connection between the past, present, and future. I also argue that futures foresight-based learning should be viewed from the perspective of social studies education because it motivates students to take action to solve problems and consolidates the positioning of learning history, geography, and civics.
Keywords
Modern and contemporary history
Future anticipation
Futures foresight
Contemporary issues
Language
eng
Resource Type journal article
Publisher
The International Social Studies Assosiation
Date of Issued 2023-03-31
Rights
Copyright © 2023 the International Social Studies Association (ISSA) and Japanese Educational Research Association for the Social Studies (JERASS). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored, transmitted, in any form, or by any means, without prior written permission from JERASS and ISSA, to whom all requests to reproduce copyright material should be directed, in writing.
Publish Type Version of Record
Access Rights open access